Elkhorn Protest in Support of SB93 this Saturday

 

 

The Elkhorn Protest In Support of SB 93 will be held in front of Elkhorn City Hall on S. Broad Street in Elkhorn, WI from 12-5pm on October 26th.  The organizations, “Wisconsin Wolf Front” and “Friends of the Wisconsin Wolf” are hosting this protest to show support for the Wisconsin State Senate Bill 93 authored by Senator Fred Risser.  This bill would remove the use of dogs from the Wisconsin State Wolf Hunt.  Elkhorn’s State Senator, Neal Kedzie is the Chair of the Senate Natural Resources Committee and he has attempted to kill SB 93 by not allowing it out of committee.  Both hosting organizations have called on Senator Kedzie to allow SB 93 to go to the floor of the State Senate, where it can be debated on its own merits. 

 

When you look at the DNA of a wolf vs. the dogs used to hunt them, they are incredibly similar. The running of hounds on wolves is really nothing more than state sanctioned dog fighting, and should have no place in a civilized society.   As evidenced by the 26 hounds killed by wolves during the recent summer, while hunting in known wolf territory,  the practice of running them directly against wolves will have obvious results.

 

Wisconsin Wolf Front organizer, Adam Kassulke, cites the recent survey conducted by student volunteers from his organization as a strong show of support for SB 93.  Over ninety days during the recent summer, groups of volunteers traveled to public events in ten Wisconsin counties.  They surveyed 6,500 Wisconsin residents of those counties regarding the use of dogs to hunt wolves.  The results showed 94% of those surveyed stated they are against the use of dogs in the hunt.  Yet, as Adam Kassulke stated, “the Department of Natural Resources and the State of Wisconsin continues to allow this barbaric practice.  Wisconsin has become the new blood sport capitol of the United States.  We are the only state in America to allow this practice.”

For more information:

Elkhorn Protest In Support Of SB 93:

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Elkhorn-Protest-In-Support-of-SB-93/340415076103680

Wisconsin Wolf Front: https://www.facebook.com/WisconsinWolfFront

3 Opening Day wolf hunt protest

Friends of Wisconsin Wolf is holding a statewide protest and it is your chance to tell your friends, neighbors, coworkers, and most of all Secretary Stepp and Governor Scott Walker that we will not stand for this wolf hunt. NO SPORT HUNT.

There are two main events planned in Wisconsin, however we encourage anyone who can’t be in either of these locations, to help organize in your community. Here in Madison, we are gathering outside the State Capitol, outdoors where we do not need a permit and also in Superior, Wisconsin from 4-6pm OCT 15th. We hope you can attend but you can take part from your home or office too! Make this Statewide! Click the link below for more information.

3 Opening Day wolf hunt protest.

Adam Kassulke: Wisconsin citizens oppose use of dogs to hunt wolves : Ct

Dear Editor: Some 6,500 residents living in 10 Wisconsin counties were recently asked, “Are you in favor of the use of trained hunting dogs to track wolves in Wisconsin during the upcoming wolf hunting season?”

By a resounding 94 percent, Wisconsin residents said “no.” Many individuals were shocked to learn that Wisconsin is the only state that allows the use of dog to hunt wolves.

I founded the Wisconsin Wolf Front, which sponsored the survey. The survey was conducted at public events each weekend during June, July and August by teams of at least three student volunteers from Wisconsin Wolf Front. Our student volunteers approached individuals at these public events, verified the individual was a resident of the county being surveyed and asked if they would take a few moments to participate in a short survey regarding a wildlife issue in Wisconsin. Surprisingly, only 2 percent declined comment.

The practice of using dogs to hunt wolves is based on poor policy. This is evidenced by the 23 hounds killed this year alone by wolves during the bear training season. Although state Sen. Fred Risser has introduced SB 93, which would ban the use of dogs to hunt wolves, the bill has been stalled in the Committee on Natural Resources since March.

It is important that we apply pressure to Sen. Neal Kedzie by asking him to move SB 93 out of committee. We must stop this archaic practice.

Adam Kassulke

Wisconsin Wolf Front

Madison

Adam Kassulke: Wisconsin citizens oppose use of dogs to hunt wolves : Ct.

Wisconsin DNR board to consider new captive deer policy

 

Wisconsin

MADISON, Wisconsin — The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources’ board is set to consider revisions to the agency’s captive deer policies this week.

The DNR has proposed changing state law to let people keep wild deer in pens if they pay fines and have veterinarians check the animals out. The agency also has proposed changing internal policies to allow DNR workers to return captive deer to the wild and specify they should euthanize captive deer only if the animals are sick or present a health risk to the public or other wildlife.

The Legislature would have to change state law to allow people to keep wild deer as pets. The DNR’s board can implement the other changes. The board is scheduled to consider them at its meeting Wednesday in Pembine.

DNR board to consider new captive deer policy.

Patricia Randolph’s Madravenspeak: Spend quiet time in woods and you won’t want to kill animals : Ct

As this column is published, I am in the 12th day of a hunger strike in solidarity with our bears and millions of other woodland creatures terrified by packs of dogs and traps, suffering and dying in this tragedy.

The Wisconsin my mother loved has turned into hell on Earth for me and my beloved innocent wild friends.

Patricia Randolph’s Madravenspeak: Spend quiet time in woods and you won’t want to kill animals : Ct.

Charlie Talbert: Why is taxpayer money being spent to promote hunting and trapping? : Ct

Cathy Stepp recently declared that the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, which she heads, will take direct control of the MacKenzie Environmental Education Center, currently operated by the Wisconsin Wildlife Federation.

What vital interest do Wisconsin taxpayers have in taking jobs from the private sector and adding them to the government payroll? Secretary Stepp explains that the state needs to recruit more hunters, anglers and trappers. Left largely unanswered is why all taxpayers must ante up to promote pastimes practiced by a dwindling few. The secretary has attempted to cost-justify her decision this way: “Hunting, fishing and trapping is our heritage, it is in our DNA, and it makes us Wisconsin.” More on that notion in a moment. First, consider the DNR’s current numbers about one of our legacies: trapping.

The DNR’s most recent fur harvest summary, for 2011-12, shows the commercial nature of trapping. Muskrats and raccoons comprised 87 percent of fur-bearing animals trapped and killed in Wisconsin, and the skins of 90 percent of them were sold. That 90 percent is about the same percent for the total of all 12 of the fur-bearing species tracked by the DNR. Of the 588,000 mammals snared and skinned, trappers made money on 516,000 of them.

These statistics raise the question: Who is buying all these skins? Most of the trappers’ “harvest” in the U.S. is sold overseas, especially to China.

The Chinese and other countries with low labor costs convert the fur into clothing, much of it exported back to the U.S. as trim on parkas and other winter wear.

But these days you seldom see a “made from” clothing tag that lists muskrat or raccoon, or the third most trapped animal in Wisconsin, opossum.

That’s because the clothing manufacturers know that most Americans have become repelled by the idea of wearing fur. Today many humane alternatives exist. So some manufacturers and marketers mislabel the actual fur as “faux fur” or “fake fur.” It’s a good deal for the trapper and dishonest dealer, but not for all involved.

Within the first 30 minutes of capture, a trapped animal can tear her flesh, rip tendons, break bones, and even knock out teeth as she bites the trap to escape.

Some animals will even bite off their own limbs in a desperate attempt to escape. The fact that an animal would sever her own limb shows how horrible the experience of being caught in a trap is. One study found that 28 percent of mink, 24 percent of raccoon, and 26 percent of trapped fox would actually bite their limbs off in hopes of surviving.

In Wisconsin centuries ago, clothing options were few. People often needed to trap to survive. But what in those days was a violent necessity — and they didn’t call it a sport — is today just a cruel money-maker.

Perhaps barbarity like this is part of our DNA, as Cathy Stepp suggests. But not all human urges deserve celebration or taxpayer support. If we want to use our past as a guide to our decisions and actions today, look to Wisconsin’s progressive heritage of adapting to the times — of challenging traditions that have become unjust, unwarranted and unnecessarily violent. That would be a vision of leadership desperately needed right now at the DNR.

Charlie Talbert  is president of the board of the Madison-based Alliance for Animals and the Environment.

Charlie Talbert: Why is taxpayer money being spent to promote hunting and trapping? : Ct.

Patricia Randolph’s Madravenspeak: Honoring Giggles the fawn with real reform of the DNR : Ct

Patricia Randolph’s Madravenspeak: Honoring Giggles the fawn with real reform of the DNR : Ct.

“Knowing her changes everything.” — Michael Smith, former hunter, who saved a fawn like Giggles from the DNR

The DNR continues to expand its national reputation for cruelty to wild creatures and the non-hunters who want to protect them. In July, 13 heavily armed people stormed the St. Francis No Kill Shelter in Kenosha to drag out a 2-week-old fawn in a bag. Even the way the DNR killed her was heavy-handed: “a bolt gun via depression of the cerebral cortex of the brain.” Though the DNR forbids citizens from raising deer due to health concerns, “Giggles” was not tested for chronic wasting disease. She was cremated. …