UW surrenders more images from the Tom Yin Lab.

Sound Localization Images

Released to People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA)

Below is a series of images released in July 2013 to People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) under Wisconsin’s open records law. The images, from a procedure performed in 2009, show a surgical procedure to place a cochlear implant into a cat, the subject of a hearing study. Earlier images were used by PETA, an organization that objects to the use of all animal models in research, to misrepresent the clinical and technological value of the work, as well as the treatment and condition of the animals used in the study. We are posting the images to preempt their misuse and continued mischaracterization of a study that has demonstrated clinical and technological benefit for humans. Read the university’s full article here.

See too:  More images from the Yin Lab.

No-Kill Animal Shelter in Need of Donations – www.nbc26.com

 

We are a big fan of Happily Ever After Animal Sanctuary.  Please watch the video below (see link) and send in a donation to this no kill animal shelter.

http://www.happilyeverafterinfo.org/donate/

GREEN BAY – A no-kill animal shelter is being pushed to the limit after the city of Green Bay’s decision to switch its policy on how to deal with stray animals.

Volunteers at Happily Ever After Animal Sanctuary are dealing with a massive influx of stray cats and dogs. It comes after city council voted to switch its contract for animal services from Bay Area Humane Society to Packerland Veterinary Center.

“It’s been very busy,” said Happily Ever After founder Amanda Reitz. “A lot of animals coming in, but the good thing is, a lot of animals going out too.”

The Packerland Veterinary Center holds Green Bay’s stray animals for 7 days before transferring them to Happily Ever After for housing and adoption. It’s a plan city leaders say is working well for Green Bay.

“We’re all animal lovers and we want to make the best provisions we could to actually take care of our animals,” said alderman Jerry Wiezbiskie.

Since the new contract with Packerland began June 1st, Happily Ever After has taken in over 50 cats and more than 20 dogs. With the volunteer shelter at capacity, shelter directors are asking the community to step up and help make Green Bay a no-kill community.

“The more that they can support us, adopt from us, donate to us.. the closer we’ll get to making that happen,” said Reitz.

No-Kill Animal Shelter in Need of Donations – www.nbc26.com.

What are Animal Rights? Watch the Best Animal Rights Documentaries Free Online

32518This video library features the best animal rights documentaries, short films and videos that can be found on the internet, all cataloged in one place for easy reference. Have you found a good film that should be in this library? 

What are Animal Rights? Watch the Best Animal Rights Documentaries Free Online.

The Badger Herald · PETA, university continue to stand at odds over USDA report

1500-double-trouble-10University of Wisconsin researchers and People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals continue to stand at odds concerning the cause of a federal agency investigation that resulted in a citation because the treatment of a cat in an experiment at a UW lab.

A UW research lab did not appeal a citation by the United States Department of Agriculture after inspectors found a case of a cat suffering a burn when the chemical hand-warmer used to keep the cat warm fell off during a surgery last April.

Eric Sandgren, UW’s Research Animal Resource Center director, said the university has been transparent about the standing citation and posted the USDA report on the university website as soon as they learned that the appeal had failed.

He added that he did not think the citation should stand because appropriate steps have been taken and new guidelines were put in place after the accident.

“The bottom line is that, yes we made a mistake. That’s been posted on our website for two weeks, right after we got the citation from USDA. I don’t know why PETA all of a sudden is bringing it up,” Sandgren said.

UW received two citations during the investigation in December and successfully appealed one, he added.

PETA spokesperson Jeremy Beckham said the report was obtained through the Freedom of Information Act and confirmed PETA’s allegations of “unrelieved, ongoing suffering of cats” in the UW lab.

Beckham also said the university has been falsely claiming to be free of all citations from USDA even though it had been notified in December and has been appealing the citations for two months.

“They knew that they were cited right when the inspector was on campus last December…and they just lost their appeal,” Beckham said. “For the past three months, the [University of Wisconsin] has been lying about what happened with the USDA investigation.”

The USDA investigation report from last December, which is on the university website, labels the investigation a “routine investigation.”

According to Sandgren, the report would have labeled it a “focused investigation” if it had been a response to PETA’s second set of complaints filed last year.

“The USDA did not separate us,” Sandgren said. “PETA is being very disingenuous. That was not a response to their allegations at least to the best of our knowledge.”

PETA filed two separate complaints against the university, one last April and another last December.

UW received no citation from USDA from the focused investigation in response to the first set of complaints.

“USDA did not find merit in any of the eight charges filed against us in the first PETA complaint,” Sandgren said. “[UW has] received no citation from their second set of complaints against the university.”

Sandgren said he has not seen the second sets of complaints filed by PETA, which is only available through filing an open information request.

PETA included five charges against the university in the second complaint alleging serious animal welfare violations, which are distinct from the previous allegations.

Sandgren said he has heard about the new complaints but cannot comment on the allegations before looking at the actual report.

“We filed [a request to obtain the report] in March but we haven’t got it yet, you can imagine how frustrated we are,” he said.

The USDA did not reply for comment as of press time.

The Badger Herald · PETA, university continue to stand at odds over USDA report.

UW-Madison Cat Cruelty Confirmed by Feds | PETA.org

Following a complaint filed by PETA, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has confirmed PETA’s allegations of rampant abuse of cats in a taxpayer-funded brain experiment at the University of Wisconsin–Madison (UW), where actor James Cromwell was arrested during a protest last month. The USDA also cited UW for violating federal animal protection laws by burning a cat named Broc so badly with a heating pad that she required surgery.

In a scathing report just obtained by PETA, a federal inspector found “a pattern of recurring infections” and that all the cats whom PETA profiled in its complaint had been “diagnosed with chronic infections” after having steel posts screwed into open wounds on their heads and metal coils implanted into their eyes. Read full article by clicking the link below.

Victory: UW-Madison Cat Cruelty Confirmed by Feds | PETA.org.

State Sen. Fred Risser wants dogs out of wolf hunt

MADISON (AP) – A Democratic state senator plans to introduce a longshot bill that would prohibit Wisconsin wolf hunters from using dogs, marking another chapter in a months-long battle to stop the practice before it begins.

Sen. Fred Risser of Madison sent an email to the rest of the Legislature on Monday asking for co-sponsors. He noted that Wisconsin is the only one of seven states with a wolf hunt that allows dogs. He said humane societies are concerned about the risk of bloody clashes between dogs and wolves.

“It doesn’t make sense to me. It’s nothing more than state-sanctioned dog fighting,” Risser said in a telephone interview. “We shouldn’t have done it in the first place and maybe we can stop it before it becomes too ingrained.”

A lawyer representing a group of humane societies that sued last year to ban wolf hunters from using dogs called the bill “wonderful.”

“That would be a very sane change in public policy,” said Carl Sinderbrand, an attorney for the Wisconsin Federated Humane Societies, Inc. “It would reflect the will of the vast majority of Wisconsinites.”

But the bill has almost no chance of success; Republicans control both the state Senate and Assembly.

Rep. Scott Suder, R-Abbotsford, was the chief sponsor of the bill that established the wolf hunt. He serves as Assembly majority leader and plays a huge role in deciding what legislation makes it to the floor for a vote. He said during a telephone interview Monday that Risser’s proposal will probably go nowhere.

“To totally eliminate an entire privilege that is out there for sportsmen, it goes too far,” Suder said.

The wolf hunt has been a flashpoint of contention since Republicans passed Suder’s bill about a year ago. Animal rights advocates see the hunt as unnecessary; farmers maintain something must be done to control a burgeoning wolf population preying on their livestock.

The bill scheduled the wolf season to run from Oct. 15 to the end of February or whenever hunters reached a kill limit imposed by the state Department of Natural Resources. The legislation allows hunters to pursue wolves with up to six dogs after the end of the November gun deer season.

Emergency rules the DNR crafted to get the first hunt off the ground limited dog use to daylight hours but set no other restrictions. A group of humane societies filed a lawsuit in August alleging the lack of regulations would lead to deadly wolf-dog fights during the season and throughout the rest of the year as hunters trained their hounds on wolves.

Dane County Circuit Judge Peter C. Anderson temporarily barred hunters from using dogs while he weighed the case. The first season began and ended while the prohibition was in place. The ban didn’t seem to hamper hunters; the DNR closed the season two months early in December after hunters had killed 117 wolves, one more than their limit.

When Anderson revisited the lawsuit in January, he concluded that the DNR didn’t have to impose restrictions on dogs in wolf hunts but that it should have tweaked its rules to account for the risk in training dogs on wolves. He issued a double-sided ruling, saying hunters could use dogs to pursue wolves during the season but barred them from training on wolves.

The DNR is currently drafting permanent rules that would allow hunters to train dogs on wolves during in-season daylight hours and the month of March. Each dog also would have to be tattooed or wear a collar with its owner’s name and address. The agency doesn’t expect to implement the rules until 2014.

The humane societies say that’s not good enough because hunters will face no restrictions going into the 2013-14 hunt.

State Sen. Fred Risser wants dogs out of wolf hunt.

Jerry Polder: Good alternatives to animal testing available : Wsj

In response to a recent guest column by director of UW-Madison’s
Research Animal Resources Center Eric Sandgren titled “Cat research,
after all the drama,” we, like actor James Cromwell, want to know the
whole truth about what goes on. Where do the cats come from and what
happens to them after being experimented on?

Whether this testing violates provisions of the Animal Welfare Act or
not, it is still likely unnecessary, as animal tests are rarely
relevant to humans and do not reliably predict outcomes in humans.

If these studies on cats, which seek to show how the brain receives
and makes sense of sound, benefit humans, doesn’t it make sense to do
these studies on humans?

It’s about time UW-Madison emerged from the past and joined modern
times to follow the lead of institutions such as Johns Hopkins, with
its Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing devoted entirely to
developing and promoting alternatives to this testing.

The center has worked with scientists since 1981 to find new methods
to replace the use of laboratory animals in experiments.

— Jerry Polder, Madison

 

Jerry Polder: Good alternatives to animal testing available : Wsj.